Seminars & Workshops

The ACFI hosts a weekly seminar series that brings researchers from around the world to present forefront research and interact with ACFI faculty, staff, and students. Informal research presentations by UMass Amherst and visitors take place in the weekly Fundamental Interactions Informal Talk.

The aim of ACFI topical workshops is to provide an opportunity for researchers from around the world to interact in a focused, short-term context to address an important open problem in the Energy, Intensity, or Cosmic frontiers as well as at their intersection. The general scope of the topical workshop is 10-20 participants who meet over a 2-5 day period at UMass Amherst, focusing on a specific problem, and formulating a plan for on-going research at the workshop conclusion.

The ACFI welcomes proposals for a topical workshop, which will be considered on a rolling basis. To submit a proposal, please contact the Director. A list of past workshops and meetings is also available.

Upcoming Workshops & Meetings

Thursday, September 28, 2017 - 9:00am to Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 1:00pm

LGRT 419B

The gamma-boson exchange diagram plays an important role in a number of different areas of nuclear and particle physics. Two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering is believed to become large at high momentum transfers to explain a large discrepancy in the proton elastic form factor determination. The gamma-Z box diagram is a significant contribution to the asymmetry in parity-violating electron scattering. Finally, the gamma-W diagram enters into beta-decays which are used to constrain fundamental elements of the Standard Model. The purpose of the workshop is to bring together both theorists and experimentalists in these different areas to improve our understanding of this important process.

Co-organizers
Jan Bernauer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Doug Hasell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Michael Kohl, Hampton U & Jefferson Lab
Richard Milner, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Michael Ramsey-Musolf, UMass Amherst