Weak, Transient Interactions Cause Strong Coupled Effects

Weak, Transient Interactions Cause Strong Coupled Effects
Jennifer Ross, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Picture of Jennifer Ross
Date and time: Wed, Oct 25, 2017 - 4:00pm
Refreshments at 3:45pm
Location: Hasbrouck 134
Category: Departmental Colloquium
Abstract:

The cell is a complex autonomous machine taking in information, performing computations, and responding to the environment. To enable agile read/write capabilities, much of the molecular biochemistry that performs these computations must be transient and weak, allowing signals to be carried as a function of the concentration of numerous and coupled interactions. Traditionally, biochemical experiments can only measure strongly interacting systems that can last for long times in dilute concentrations. We have developed microscopy measurements to enable to visualization of weak, transient interactions and the resulting emergent behaviors of coupled systems. I will present excerpts from stories where many weak, transient interactions can have strong repercussions on the overall activity and can, in fact, overpower strongly interacting systems. These studies involve the microtubule cytoskeleton and the transport motor, kinesin-1.  Our results reveal a fundamentally important aspect of cellular self-organization: weak, transient interacting species can tune their interaction strength directly by tuning the local concentration to act like a rheostat. The tunability of weak, transient interactions is a fundamental activity of biological systems, and our insights will ultimately enable us to learn how to engineer thesis systems to create biological or biomimetic devices.